REMEMBERING KEITH

REMEMBERING KEITH

Lono Brazil looks back on his times with Keith Haring

Written By Lono Brazil

One night Keith came to a party at Nell’s for art dealer Tony Shafrazi. As he was leaving he turned back to me and offered me a button to put on my Levi’s Trucker’s Jacket. I asked him if he could tag my jacket, since I saw his tag all over the Village I figured I might as well ask. So he obliged. He always carried sharpies in his bag, so he drew a little man on the back with a black sharpie. I saw him not long after at the Garage again and he brought me into his group. I started hanging out at his studio at 676 Broadway in Greenwich Village. Lots of cool people used to come through that studio. And it put me in the loop into the Downtown 80’s art scene.

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THE NASTY BOYS

The unsung tag team champions of the WWF

Rising to the pinnacle of the tag team ranks by 1991, it was Wrestlemania VII that would mark the apex of The Nasty Boys WWF career. Overcoming the efforts of The Hart Foundation that night, The Nasty Boys would spend much of 1991 as the reigning WWF Tag Team Champions of the world.

You’d be surprised to know the origins of The Nasty Boys. Born Brian Knobs and Jerry Sags, the duo were in fact childhood friends whose similar dream of wrestling professionally actually became reality. Although champions in their own right, The Nasty Boys in ring skills left many to question their legitimacy as wrestlers, as Mick Foley recalls The Nasty Boys were, “sloppy as hell, and more than a little dangerous.”

Engaging in numerous feuds with top talent from the Legion of Doom and Harlem Heat to Money Inc. and the NWO, The Nasty Boys never did reach the same acclaim they obtained in 1991. Although their legacy remains intact as a quintessential example over the top characters that exemplified the WWF in the early 90’s.

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REMEMBERING DARIA

REMEMBERING DARIA

A look back on the understated, underappreciated voice of a generation

Daria

Written By Danielle Schnur

Before the cinematic deadpan heroines of Juno and Ghost World emerged to mirror our teen angst, apathy, and simultaneous bleeding hearts, there was Daria. Like a diasporic leader of all things achieving that unique balance of holier than thou and “do I look like a give a fuck?”, Daria was the true proto-hipster and an unsung voice of our generation before we were even ready to hear it. Yet unlike her later sisters of sarcasm on the big screen, her MTV cartoon aired somewhere around the popularity peak of her very antithesis, late-90s/early-00s Britney Spears and TRL. And we loved her for it.

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Marjoe Gortner: The Miracle Child

Marjoe Gortner: The Miracle Child

The life and times of America's youngest ordained minister

“Hello my name is Marjoe Gortner and I’m here to give the devil two black eyes.” Before he learned to say “Mama” or “Poppa,” he was taught to sing “Hallelujah!” At nine months, his mother taught him the proper way to shout “glory” into the microphone. By the age of three, he could preach the gospel by memory. His name is Marjoe Gortner, and he is known as the youngest preacher in American history, ordained at the age of four. Born on January 14th, 1944 in Long Beach California, Marjoe was the son of Vernon Gortner a third generation minister who guided his son’s career as a preacher. Nearly strangled to death by his own umbilical chord during his birth, doctors told his mother it was a miracle that he survived, and thus, “Marjoe” was born; a combination of the biblical names Mary and Joseph.

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CARL SAGAN ON BOOKS

CARL SAGAN ON BOOKS

An excerpt from Sagan's epic Cosmos on the power of the written word

Carl Sagan

A book is made from a tree. It is an assemblage of flat, flexible parts, still called “leaves”, imprinted with dark pigmented squiggles. One glance at it and your hear the voice of another person–perhaps someone dead for thousands of years. Across the millenia, the author is speaking, clearly and silently, inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people, citizens of distant epochs, who never knew one another. Books break the shackles of time, proof that humans can work magic.

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THE DEATH OF THE BISON

THE DEATH OF THE BISON

A historical glimpse into the systematic slaughter and rapid decline of the American buffalo

At one point their population numbered in the tens of millions, the Great Plains of North America their habitat and domain. They were the bison, also known as the American buffalo, and were the native inhabitants of the Great Western Plains. Benefiting from plentiful land and resources, the bison flourished for several millennia before humans inhabited their land. Their territory was extensive, but the 19th century would prove fatal for the vast majority of the bison population. Hunted to near extinction by American market hunters, the once massive bison population was reduced to a mere 1,000 by the turn of the century.

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PRINCE THE HOOPER

Prince's former bodyguard Harlan Austin sheds light on the iconic artist's basketball prowess

Some of you, if not most of you recall Charlie Murphy’s True Hollywood Stories from Chappelle’s Show. Detailing one of the comedian’s more memorable tales from his days in Hollywood, you’ll recall Charlie’s story of the night he and his friends played Prince and the Revolution in a game of basketball.

While hilarious for a variety of reasons, it turns out much of Charlie’s story lands closer to fact than fiction. Enter Harlan “Hucky” Austin. A Close Protection Operative and bodyguard who spent over 20 years serving as a private bodyguard to Prince himself, Harlan sheds more light on the rumors of Prince’s basketball skills in a short story of his own.

For Harlan, who was never too far from the iconic artist, it seems as though memories of Prince’s basketball prowess still circulate amongst those who were there. As the bodyguard puts it, apparently Prince was one of the nicest to step on the court. But don’t take our word for it, hit the MORE and read for yourself.

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SIDDHARTHA & GOTAMA

SIDDHARTHA & GOTAMA

A passage from Hermann Hesse's seminal 1922 novel Siddhartha

Siddhartha

Siddhartha wandered through the grove deep in thought.

There he met Gotama, the Illustrious One, and as he greeted him respectfully and the Buddha’s expression was so full of goodness and peace, the young man plucked up courage and asked the Illustrious One’s permission to speak to him. Silently the Illustrious One nodded his permission.

Siddhartha said: “Yesterday, O Illustrious One, I had the pleasure of hearing your wonderful teachings. I came from afar with my friend to hear you, and now my friend will remain with you; he has sworn allegiance to you. I however, am continuing my pilgrimage anew.”

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INDIA, 1969

INDIA, 1969

Photography by Roloff Beny

Roloff Beny

Canadian photographer Roloff Beny is often described as having “obsessed with the beauty of the world”. Reading the words he wrote about India, or even a glance at the images he brought back from a handful of adventures there confirms that pretty convincingly. Aside from the beauty he found in the visual world, Beny was also famous for his illustrious lifestyle: friends in high places, storied parties and a lavish penthouse in Rome all seem to surface often when Beny’s life is being discussed.

Most importantly, Beny was a world traveler, and India is one of a number of his works which could effectively be described as a love letter to the place it documents. One of the most impressive examples of his eye for color, scenery and natural beauty, India finds Beny exploring a place with no shortage of gorgeous landscapes, architecture, and rich culture. In some ways, these images read like an idyllic Westerner’s portrait, an aesthetically idealized version of a complex place– and you could definitely make the case. Either way though, they’re pretty spectacular shots.

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WORLD WAR II BOMBER JACKETS

Wine & Bowties

Yeah, I know. Writing about the most colossally tragic and complex conflict in human history through the lens of style seems pretty questionable. Still, I think these images, and the iconic gear that was their focus have a lot to offer as a window into wartime America circa 1945. Though the shots of the soldiers are faceless, the jackets themselves reflect the experience of being a fighter pilot during turbulent times, as well as the things that were important to them– yeah, sexy girls and bombs, but also solidarity– putting on for your city, your crew, your country.

A staple of military garb for decades, the flight jacket was initially borne out of necessity, as WWI-era planes lacked enclosed, insulated cockpits, exposing their pilots to extreme cold. It was WWII, however, that ushered in the A-2, the iconic jackets pictured in this particular set, along with the patches and decorations for which they’re now known. Over the years, the jackets have become coveted items, with resurgences in popularity among everyone from mods to skinheads and beyond. I can’t say I’m the biggest patriot in the world, but I suppose a little vintage Americana never hurt anybody.

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DOING IT IN THE PARK

DOING IT IN THE PARK

The Park

You have to love a photographer that manages to capture all the beautiful depravity that goes down in the underbelly of a big city. Pretty much regardless of the era or the location, it’s out there, as long you’re looking hard enough. Granted, my knowledge of Tokyo in the ’70s is limited, but from what I can tell, folks were getting down in the park. Frequenting Tokyo’s Shinjuku, Yoyogi and Aoyama parks, photographer Kohei Yoshiyuki documented some of the city’s more adventurous citizens in action, as well as a handful of their secret–and, apparently, sometimes not-so-secret– spectators. Armed with 35mm film, an infrared lens and a camera with a flash, Yoshiyuki managed to capture a snapshot of a fascinating sexual subculture, in all its desperate, voyeuristic glory. The Park has been shown at galleries worldwide, and was re-published as a book in 2007. Try to find a copy here, or enjoy the gallery below.

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THE ELROD HOUSE

THE ELROD HOUSE

Elrod House

How much is too much when it comes to luxury? I know I can’t be the only one who dreams of one day occupying an abode fit for Tony Montana. However, knowing your limits of excess is something to consider when the dough starts rolling in and it seems like it’ll never end. But in my humble, I’d say the Elrod House, situated in the hills of Palm Springs got it just about right. Uniting luxury with a touch of taste and environmental awareness, the Elrod House remains one of the states’ most well known homes. Used in numerous photo shoots for Playboy in addition to a fight scene from the James Bond classic Diamonds Are Forever, the Elrod House has been celebrated for its vibrant aesthetics since its construction in 1968. Designed by John Lautner for interior designer Arthur Elrod, the Elrod House serves as a pleasant reminder that luxury and tastefulness are not mutually exclusive.

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